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How to fight insomnia due to coronavirus

03.12.2020

It is possible that the first few times you have had trouble sleeping during the coronavirus pandemic, you may think they were due to a lack of activity. You also notice that the same thing happens to many of your friends. It turns out that the problem of dealing with coronavirus anxiety probably plays a big role in sudden insomnia.

 

There are more and more people, worried, with anxiety ... and more insomnia. Of course, not having enough hours in bed can also fuel anxiety, creating a vicious circle. You're stressed, so you can't sleep, which makes you even more stressed. We will give you advice on how to break this cycle tonight.

 

Stop working out of bed

 

We know, we know… when you work from home, your bed turns into a desk. And maybe a dinner table and a sofa too. The workday is gone. There are no schedules any more and that's why people work late at night and stay up very late. But now it is more important than ever to be strict about what you do between the sheets.

 

If you work in bed, you will begin to associate your bedroom with the stress of the day. Use your mattress only for sleep and caresses - it will suddenly become a much more relaxing place.

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Train

 

Stopping workouts in the gym does not bring anything good to sleep. Doing 30 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise will help you sleep better that night. Walking, jogging, or a high-intensity HIIT workout on the living room floor will speed up your heart rate enough to make a difference. And fortunately, YouTube is full of free workouts right now.

 

Avoid alcohol before bed

 

Drink a glass of wine with dinner, but stop after dessert. Alcohol interferes with the body's ability to regulate sleep, according to many studies. It may seem that a few drinks help you fall asleep, but they reduce the quality of your sleep in general, so you will wake up feeling tired.

In addition, alcohol is a diuretic, which increases the need to go to the toilet often, and makes you wake up earlier in the morning.

 

Try a relaxation application

 

Sometimes you find that even when you are exhausted, as soon as you turn off the lights, your mind begins to race. If this sounds familiar, try listening to sleep meditation while relaxing. You can try the Chris Hemsworth’s Center app, but there are a million other free apps and video options on YouTube. Look for a special mindfulness meditation that has been proven to improve the quality of sleep. Practice increases melatonin - the hormone that makes you drowsy.

 

Limit your time in front of screens

 

Set aside everything that shines directly in your eyes for 30-60 minutes before your desired bedtime. This includes your phone, tablet, TV and laptop. Your body needs dim light to release melatonin. If you can't end your session on FaceTime or Instagram, at least dim the screen as much as possible, and keep it away from your face.

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Avoid the news

 

If you refuse to eliminate screens, at least say goodbye to the news - especially before bed. Yes, it is important to be informed about what is happening in the world. But sticking to the coronavirus news before you go to sleep can make you more anxious. The result? Tossing and turning in bed all night.

 

Experiment with giving yourself a specific time for news. Cut off the news a few hours before bed so your head can rest and your stress levels sink. It's amazing how little you miss in those few short hours.

 

Talk to someone

 

There is a huge link between mental health and sleep. People feel isolated and alone and their mental health may not be doing well and insomnia is a symptom of this. It's important to look at it and be honest with yourself and say, "Maybe I'm not as well as I think." Anxiety can be mean - you may not even realize that this is what fuels your insomnia.

 

If these tips do not help solve your sleep problems, or if insomnia is something you have had before and is getting worse, we recommend that you consult a medical professional. Your sleep is important for your overall health and mental health, so keeping it in excellent condition is a must during quarantine.

 

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